Restoring Normal Tab Service in Firefox 3.6

(stackoverflow rep: 9948, Project Euler 93/281 complete)

(in which we address something fairly trivial)

Firefox 3.6 introduced a change where by default opening a link in a new tab places the tab immediately after the current one. Which seriously messed up my workflow.

Tab background courtesy of FF's new "persona" skinning thingummybob. Not sure how I feel about that, either.

I have a bunch of links (Google Reader, Hacker News – or rather Giles Bowkett’s rather spiffy Hacker Newspaper, reddit, stuff like that) from which I open any interesting links, to be consumed with my breakfast while my brain gets into second gear. Maybe it’s just me and my inability to move with the times, but I like my tabs sorted in the order in which I opened them, thank you very much.

This (http://support.mozilla.com/en-US/forum/1/602853#threadId602882) is where I found the fix.

For the idle of click, this is what it says:

Type about:config into the URL/location bar and press the Enter key.
Click through any warning (i.e., promise to be careful)
Copy and paste the following into the Filter box:

browser.tabs.insertRelatedAfterCurrent

Double-click the line listing that preference to change the value to false.
Restart Firefox (File > Restart Firefox)

And that’s it. Seems to work. Which is nice.

Sometimes It’s The Little Things

(stackoverflow rep: 9138, Project Euler 90/274 complete)

From time to time I trawl through my blog subscriptions: some are defunct while others may have changed their feed details sufficently that they’re no longer being picked up. I have about 270 subscriptions, which makes the job a chore and hence it doesn’t get done very frequently. The upshot is, for the case where the blog hasn’t just died, I sometimes miss something.

What should we do with tedious manual activities? Automate! I went and did some investigation.

Google Reader will, through the “manage subscriptions” link (it’s at the bottom of the subscriptions list in my browser) let you download your details in an XML (more specifically, Outline Processor Markup Language, or OPML) file. It looks like this (heavily snipped to avoid excess tedium):

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<opml version="1.0">
    <head>
        <title>mikewoodhouse subscriptions in Google Reader</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        <outline title="misc" text="misc">
            <outline text="Grumpy Old Programmer"
                title="Grumpy Old Programmer" type="rss"
                xmlUrl="http://grumpyop.wordpress.com/feed/" htmlUrl="http://grumpyop.wordpress.com"/>
            <outline text="Google Code Blog" title="Google Code Blog"
                type="rss"
                xmlUrl="http://google-code-updates.blogspot.com/atom.xml" htmlUrl="http://googlecode.blogspot.com/"/>
        </outline>
    </body>
</opml>

Ignoring for the moment the beauties of XML, this is pretty simple: there’s an outer “outline” that matches the folder I’ve created in Reader, within which is an outline for each feed to which I’m subscribed.

What I wanted to do is something like this:

  • parse the OPML, extracting the xmlUrl tag;
  • download the feed using that tag;
  • scan the entry listing in the feed to find the latest entry date, as a proxy for the last-known activity on that blog;
  • review the blogs that seemed oldest and deadest for update or removal.

Simples!

Well, with a little Googling and not much Rubying, it actually turned out to be so. John Nunemaker‘s HappyMapper gem does a quick enough job of the parsing:

require 'happymapper'
module OPML
  class Outline
    include HappyMapper
    tag 'outline'
    attribute :title, String
    attribute :\xmlUrl, String # remove the \ - WordPress insists on trying to make a smiley out of colon-x
    has_many :\outlines, Outline # see above. Stupid WordPress. Or me. Or both.
  end
end

sections = OPML::Outline.parse(File.read("google-reader-subscriptions.xml"))
sections.delete_if { |section| section.outlines.size == 0 } # remove outline children with no parents

The delete_if part is there to cater for my parse creating duplicates of the “child” outlines: once in their own right and once within their parent section. I’m pretty sure I’ve seen how to avoid that somewhere, but for now this will do, since all my subscriptions live in folders. It leaves something there for the next iteration.

And then there’s the spiffy little Feed Normalizer gem, that will parse RSS or Atom agnostically, which is good: I don’t want to have to care.

require 'feed-normalizer'
require 'open-uri'

sections.each do |section|
 section.outlines.each do |feed|
 list = FeedNormalizer::FeedNormalizer.parse(open(feed.xmlUrl))
 latest = list.entries.map{|entry| entry.date_published}.max
 puts "#{section.title} #{feed.title} #{latest}"
 end
end

Job done.

OK, this is the everything-works-as-expected version, which assumes files will always exist (they won’t), date strings are present and valid (they aren’t), but nobody wants to see a pile of exception- and error-handling code. Or at least, they shouldn’t. Not in a blog post.

harrylillis.com would probably have been cheaper

Putting 2 and 2 together, Jeff Atwood appears to have paid* a fairly large (to me) sum to acquire the superuser.com domain. I wonder how much Microsoft paid for bing.com?

I switched my default search engine to Microsoft’s new beta search engine yesterday. Today I switched back to Google. Not that bing was all that bad – to be honest I couldn’t see much difference between what it gave me and what I see from Google. The background picture, which I guessed was of some Greek island yesterday (it’s somewhere different, but similarly attractive today) was certainly pleasant.

The killer was that after Firefox (3.0.10) reported that the page load was “Done” (and the results certainly seemed to be present) there was a delay – during which time FF froze completely – of about 12 seconds, after which my browser shook itself and woke up.

I don't need to search to find Microsoft being annoying...

I don't need to search to find Microsoft being annoying...

Bing could be the best search engine in the world ever and I’d still not use it if that delay were present. I can’t believe it occurs for all users for all browsers but I’m only me and I prefer FireFox. It could be some interaction with one or more of my – fairly standard – plugins. Maybe I’ll try it again when the beta is done.

Your mileage, of course, may vary.

* Unless of course he was tweeting about another one, which is entirely possible.

[Wi|Ga]dgets – what’s the use?

(stackoverflow rep: 2539, Project Euler 47/227 complete)

Gadgets? We don’t need no stinking gadgets!

Microsoft, Yahoo! and Google, to name but three proponents, each have a desktop widget (or gadget, or whatever) model, either providing stuff spread out all over your Windows (are OSX and other *nix environments similarly afflicted?) desktop or tucked away in a “Sidebar”. These handy-dandy little applets provide information on such vitally otherwise hard-to-get functions such as:

  • The weather (for those not in sight of a window?);
  • RSS feeds (for those who want to read their feeds in a 2″x1″ window);
  • An e-mail notifier (because you still don’t understand the meaning of ‘asynchronous’);
  • The time (for those who can’t read the little digital clock on their taskbar and who don’t own a watch);
  • A calculator (because the world needs another computer desktop calculator);
  • Resource usage monitors (so you can tell your computer isn’t running slow);
  • A mediocre controller for your media player (because media players don’t have minimised controls … oh, yes they do);
  • Teeny-tiny picture viewers (for when flickr is just too much detail)
  • Out-of-date stock tickers (so you can see in delayed real-time how much poorer you are today)

… you get the idea.

Even better, all these are neatly tucked away on a “sidebar” (a sort of non-window window) or even better, spread out all over the shop, which is exactly what you want on a two- or three-screen setup. And they’re all handily concealed beneath the applications you’re running at any time. You know, those stupid time-wasters like Outlook, Excel, Firefox, Word, Visual Studio, a couple of Explorers and a database utility or two.

Marvellous.

What we seem to have here are a collection of (sometimes) graphically pleasing little applications that deliver functionality available elsewhere, each having one or more of the following drawbacks:

  • Always-present, seldom needed;
  • Inadequate functionality;
  • Duplicate of something that’s already fit-for-purpose;
  • Pointless eye-candy;
  • Invisible.

Unloved

Looking at Yahoo!’s programming category, I find that the most popular has been downloaded 80,000 times. It’s a widget that performs geolocation for a given IP address. With a flag. I’m trying to imagine a situation where I (or anyone) would need that often enough to abandon a browser-based function, opting for a desktop-resident applet against a “proper” application because I don’t need it that much. I don’t exactly see the “programming” connection either, come to think.

Yahoo programming widget downloads as at 12-Jan-2009

Data as at 12-Jan-2009

I’m probably not being fair – I thought the most useful stuff would be written for programmers. What does it look like overall? I can’t tell much from Google’s list because they don’t give download stats, although sorting by popularity shows the expected four C’s (clock, climate, calculator, calendar). So back to Yahoo! where the current Number One, with a snappy 4.5 million downloads, is Yahoo! Weather. In fact, as I write this, a whopping six widgets have passed the million mark. Only two are clocks.

Oh look - Microsoft Sidebar does weather too

Oh look - Microsoft Sidebar does weather too

The highlights of a quick-and-dirty breakdown of the top 100 are 19 fun-and-games, 15 system monitor thingies, 14 clocks, 9 calendars, 8 media players, 7 weather reports, 6 post-it notes, 5 gold rings. Very similar to the Google list. I was too depressed to look at Microsoft’s in any detail, but it’s the same ol’ same ol’, although their weather widget claims over 22 million downloads. I’m guessing it’s downloaded automatically when a Vista PC connects to the Internet…

Number one Google gadget - because you can never have too many clocks

Number one Google gadget - because you can never have too many clocks

I’m not getting it. Looks like many others aren’t either. The numbers of people who come back to provide a rating are miniscule: about 7,000 for the weather app. About 0.16%

Apart from the shocking paucity of imagination in the applets themselves, what’s wrong with the whole idea? (IMHO, of course, YMMV).

Real estate is Precious

There are people out there who have enough monitors to be able to allocate space for widgets. Two 1280×1024 screens isn’t enough for me though. Utility drops to almost zero if the things aren’t always available. Google make things worse by allowing applets to live anywhere on the desktop. Stuff needs to go in a sidebar that manages window maximisation to keep itself visible. So it needs to be on the right- or left-most monitor, unless you’re prepared to give up on dual-screen workbooks. For the average user, the bar needs to be a lot narrower than at present to be tolerable. Somewhere between, say, 25 and 50 pixels? I could live with that.

Useful vs Pretty

Useful doesn’t always win. Useful-but-ugly often doesn’t get past “Go”, whereas Pretty at least gets a chance. Long-term, it’s got to have both: too much of what’s on offer seems to be limited to pretty useless.

To offer a compelling argument against rapid deletion, applets have to either provide something in a better way than is currently available or provide something that isn’t available at all elsewhere . Example: there is a Ruby script that allows, from the command line, simple copying of files to an Amazon S3 bucket. Useful. Maybe we could have a widget (maybe it already exists, but I couldn’t find one) that allows upload via drag-and-drop from Explorer. That would be better than what’s already available. Something I can’t do at all except via cut and paste is store stuff in Google Notebook. A drag-and-drop gadget to simplify that would be providing something I can’t do at all.

Conclusion

I don’t know that I have one. There are several similar implementations of a desktop XML/Javascript applet technology that has a lot of money invested in it. Well, I don’t know how much exactly, but I bet I’d be a happy old programmer if you’d given it all to me instead. And you might as well have done exactly that, for all the benefit mankind appears to be accruing. It ought to be good for something, oughtn’t it?

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