My (Im)perfect Cousin?

in which we start to worry about the source of our inspiration
Mona Lisa Vito: So what’s your problem?
Vinny Gambini: My problem is, I wanted to win my first case without any help from anybody.
Lisa: Well, I guess that plan’s moot.
Vinny: Yeah.
Lisa: You know, this could be a sign of things to come. You win all your cases, but with somebody else’s help. Right? You win case, after case, – and then afterwards, you have to go up somebody and you have to say- “thank you“! Oh my God, what a fuckin’ nightmare!


It is one of the all-time great movies, and netted Marisa Tomei an Oscar in the process. Yes it is. It really is1.

Not only that, but My Cousin Vinny2 throws up parallels in real life all the time. Yes it does. It really does3.

Why only recently, I was puzzling over the best (or least worst) way to implement a particularly nonsensical requirement for an intransigent client. After summarising the various unpalatable options in an email, a reply arrived from a generally unproductive source. The message content made it obvious that he’d somewhat missed the point but the conclusion he drew from that misunderstanding triggered a new thought process that gave us a new, even less, er, worser solution to our problem.

Sadly, my unwitting muse has moved on now, but he left his mark for all time4 on our latest product. I suppose he should also take partial credit for the creation of a hitherto unknown development methodology: Powerpoint-Driven Development, but that’s a story for another day.


1 All right, IMHO
2 See also My Cousin Vinny At Work, application of quotes therefrom
3 YMMV.
4 Or at least until we have a better idea and change the whole damn thing

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That Do Impress Me Much

Over at stackoverflow, now that they have a pile of money to spend invest, the rate of change is picking up. There’s the re-worked stack exchange model, which has changed dramatically – and quite likely for the better. They’ve moved away from the original paid-for hosted service to a community-driven process, whereby a community needs to form and commit to the idea of a new site. The objective is to improve the prospects of achieving critical mass for a new site, thus increasing its chances of success. I imagine a revenue model is mooted, although it may be little more than “if we build it, they will come” at present. Sponsored tags and ads spring to mind.

This week we’ve seen the covers removed (perhaps for a limited time initially) on a “third place“, to go with the existing main Q&A and “meta” (questions about the Q&A site). It’s a chat room. Well, lots of chat rooms of varying degrees of focus, to be more specific. Quite nicely done, too.

What has really impressed me has been that during this “limited sneak beta preview”, bugs, issues, feature requests and the like have been flowing through the interface at a fair rate of knots and many have been addressed and released within hours. Minutes, sometimes.

Think about it. User detects a bug, reports it and gets a fix, to an application with global reach, in a couple of hours or less. That’s agile.

A crucial part of Lean movement in manufacturing (and its younger counterpart in software development) is eliminating waste. “Waste” is broadly defined, very broadly defined, in fact, but one easily identifiable component is Work In Progress (WIP). In software terms, this often represents effort that has been invested (and money that’s been tied up) without having been included in a release. The more we invest effort without release the more we’re wasting, since we have no possibility of obtaining a return on that investment.

Here’s a particularly quick find/fix from earlier today:

Yes, it was probably a trivial bug, but the problem was notified, found, fixed and released in eight frickin’ minutes. How many of us can turn anything around that fast?

I’m looking forward to seeing where this goes.

My Mother Would Be So Proud

(stackoverflow rep: 10,038, Project Euler 96/283 complete)

(in which it transpires that I’ve been something creative all along)

Perhaps because I don’t speak Swedish very well (for values of “very well” that are exactly equal to “at all”) I didn’t notice this blog post until today, when I came across it in a link from a comment on post in a blog that I do read.

Earlier this week I was struggling to impress upon a colleague that I thought that he should write some code instead of spending additional time “getting a complete understanding of all the issues” and “acquiring a good knowledge of the technical framework”. I wondered if it was some deficiency in my communication “skills” – and that could very well be the case – but I’m starting to think that we have very different views on the purpose of code, perhaps because he’s from an academic mathematical background and I’m just an old hacker. I think he sees the code-writing process as the final expression of his understanding of a problem, where I use code to develop that understanding. Not surprisingly, within our problem domain I think I have the more appropriate model. Anyway, I outrank him…

Maybe it’s an Internet phenomenon (or more likely just human nature) that the same idea (meme?) is rediscovered on a regular basis. I remember reading – and being influenced by – a similar article several years ago. A quick search threw up an even older article making a similar point. Yes, even almost 20 years ago, the transition from source to executable was relatively cheap.

If we view the act of writing source code as part of the design of the program and not part of the build, then we move further away from the commonly-applied physical engineering metaphor and this is no bad thing. It doesn’t take much mental effort: any substantial change in the design of a building is likely to be immensely expensive after the building is constructed, whereas rebuilding a whole program or application is relatively cheap once the design (source) has been updated. Once you get to web apps, where even deployment is almost free, then you’re a long way from the building site.

Further, if we see coding as design, then the notion of starting small and enhancing iteratively, tidying (refactoring) as we go becomes a much more obviously good thing. To my mind, at least.

So – look Ma! I’m a designer!

Shippity-doo-dah

(stackoverflow rep: 7576, Project Euler 83/257 complete)
In my band days we called it "Gaffer"

In my band days we called it "Gaffer"

Reading Joel’s1 Duct-Tape Programmer article this morning (in the interests of full disclosure I should admit without additional prevarication that I have a large roll of “Duck” tape in the second drawer of my desk as I type) one sentence smacked me metaphorically between the eyes:

“Shipping is a feature”

I was transported back a couple of decades to the time when the bank for whom I was then working discovered that it was building not one but two settlement systems (the things that ensure that what traders agree should happen actually does) in two locations: London and Zurich. In London we were targeting our DEC VAX/Oracle platform, while the Swiss were designing with their local Tandem Non-Stop installation. And we’d both have gotten away with it if it hadn’t been for that meddling CEO…

It was decreed that The Wise Men (external auditors) be appointed to review the two projects and pronounce which should live and which should consign its members to the dole queue.

The Wise Ones duly decamped to Zurich to spend a few weeks working through the cabinets of meticulously-detailed standards-compliant design documentation that had been lovingly crafted over the past several months, with coding about to start. Then they came to see us. It didn’t look so good.

dried-up and crusty now...

dried-up and crusty now...

What documentation we had was months old (from a previous, aborted start of the waterfall) and coated in Tipp-Ex. Remember the white error-correction fluid we used all the time back in the 20th Century? When we still wrote “memos”? After a week of vagueness and frustration a set of presentations were scheduled for the Friday, at which we proposed to try to fill in the gaps.

england2switz1

Ing-er-land!

London won.

Yay us, but how? On most objective measurements we were deficient when compared with our continental rivals, even we agreed on that. But on that Friday afternoon, I got to stand up to summarise the differences, positive and negative between the two projects, as seen by the London team. I think what may have swung it was the part where I got to say “our system has been settling trades since 3 o’clock this morning”.

In about nine months, one team had done everything by the Book (don’t know the title, but I bet it had “Structured” in it) and had reached the point where they had, well, a book. Lots of books, in fact – they’d worked really hard. In the same time, we built a system and even better, shipped it. I don’t think anyone had written any Agile books by then – even if they had, we hadn’t read them.

Our team hadn’t done an awful job by any means, you understand: there’d been a few weeks of up-front requirement-gathering/scoping.  We had a massive data model that we Tipp-Exed down to the minimum needed. We had an outline architecture that, through luck or judgement, proved to be appropriate. Probably best of all, though, we sat with our users while we built their system. Better, as we built different features we moved around so we were always within speaking distance of our domain expert (I don’t think we’d done the whole “domain” thing then – we just called them “users”). So  we seldom got very far off track while stuff got built, and we were, with hindsight, feature-driven and relatively lowly-coupled/highly cohesive at the component level, all Good Things. Mostly written in COBOL, too.

Looking back, we were lucky: we didn’t manage to repeat the magic and fell back into time and cost overruns with the next couple of large projects. At least we were still being paid, unlike our erstwhile colleagues in Switzerland.


1 I call him by his first name because we share so much; we’re only a few slots apart on page 13 of StackOverflow as I write this. Page-mates, don’t you know.